Polymer-modified microbially induced carbonate precipitation for one-shot targeted and localized soil improvement

Xiangrong Wang, Junliang Tao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The viscous nature of certain hydrophilic polymer solutions and the tendency of these solutions to retain moisture may make them suitable carriers for the process of microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) for certain engineering proposes. Specifically, tuning the viscosity of the cementation solution enables the control of its infiltration process and thus control of the treatment region in highly permeable soils; the enhanced water retention also helps to maintain the moist conditions required for MICP in certain treatment cases. Therefore, it seems promising to utilize a hydrophilic polymer to develop a one-shot polymer-modified MICP approach for potential applications that require localized and targeted soil improvement. Presented in this paper are experiments conducted to investigate a new polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-modified MICP approach. Standard Ottawa graded sand was treated using both polymer-modified and conventional water-based MICP solutions with different concentrations of cementation media. For the obtained specimens, the chemical components were identified through thermogravimetric analysis, the CaCO 3 content was measured, and unconfined compression tests were conducted to evaluate the shear strength. The morphology, distribution, and crystal polymorphs of the precipitated CaCO 3 were also characterized. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed polymer-modified MICP approach as a one-shot MICP treatment scheme. Moreover, two bench-scale soil improvement cases were conducted to highlight the advantages of the proposed polymer-modified MICP approach over the water-based approach for certain potential soil improvement applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-671
Number of pages15
JournalActa Geotechnica
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

soil improvement
Carbonates
polymer
Soils
carbonate
Polymers
cementation
Water
Polyvinyl alcohols
Polymer solutions
water retention
Polymorphism
Infiltration
Shear strength
shear strength
Thermogravimetric analysis
alcohol
infiltration
Moisture
Sand

Keywords

  • CaCO polymorph
  • Hydrophilic polymer
  • Microbially induced carbonate precipitation
  • One shot
  • Soil improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Polymer-modified microbially induced carbonate precipitation for one-shot targeted and localized soil improvement. / Wang, Xiangrong; Tao, Junliang.

In: Acta Geotechnica, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.06.2019, p. 657-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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