Police education, experience, and the use of force

Eugene A. Paoline, William Terrill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Police researchers have devoted a considerable amount of empirical attention to testing the impact college education has on police performance. The counterargument to the education debate is that experience, in learning the police craft, is what contributes to differences in performance. The current study adds to both lines of research by examining the impact of education and experience on one of the core features of the police role: the use of coercion. The findings indicate that varying levels of education and experience are related to differences in the use of coercion in encounters with citizens. Encounters involving officers with any college education result in significantly less verbal force compared to those with a high school education. However, only those encounters involving officers with a 4-year degree result in significantly less physical force. Finally, encounters involving officers with greater experience result in less verbal and physical force.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-196
Number of pages18
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Police
police
Education
Coercion
education
experience
school education
level of education
performance
citizen
Research Personnel
Learning
learning
Research

Keywords

  • Coercion
  • College education
  • Experience
  • Police
  • Use of force

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Police education, experience, and the use of force. / Paoline, Eugene A.; Terrill, William.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 34, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 179-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{23f52a19c50f4ab4a55a29f663a18abf,
title = "Police education, experience, and the use of force",
abstract = "Police researchers have devoted a considerable amount of empirical attention to testing the impact college education has on police performance. The counterargument to the education debate is that experience, in learning the police craft, is what contributes to differences in performance. The current study adds to both lines of research by examining the impact of education and experience on one of the core features of the police role: the use of coercion. The findings indicate that varying levels of education and experience are related to differences in the use of coercion in encounters with citizens. Encounters involving officers with any college education result in significantly less verbal force compared to those with a high school education. However, only those encounters involving officers with a 4-year degree result in significantly less physical force. Finally, encounters involving officers with greater experience result in less verbal and physical force.",
keywords = "Coercion, College education, Experience, Police, Use of force",
author = "Paoline, {Eugene A.} and William Terrill",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1177/0093854806290239",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "179--196",
journal = "Criminal Justice and Behavior",
issn = "0093-8548",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Police education, experience, and the use of force

AU - Paoline, Eugene A.

AU - Terrill, William

PY - 2007/2

Y1 - 2007/2

N2 - Police researchers have devoted a considerable amount of empirical attention to testing the impact college education has on police performance. The counterargument to the education debate is that experience, in learning the police craft, is what contributes to differences in performance. The current study adds to both lines of research by examining the impact of education and experience on one of the core features of the police role: the use of coercion. The findings indicate that varying levels of education and experience are related to differences in the use of coercion in encounters with citizens. Encounters involving officers with any college education result in significantly less verbal force compared to those with a high school education. However, only those encounters involving officers with a 4-year degree result in significantly less physical force. Finally, encounters involving officers with greater experience result in less verbal and physical force.

AB - Police researchers have devoted a considerable amount of empirical attention to testing the impact college education has on police performance. The counterargument to the education debate is that experience, in learning the police craft, is what contributes to differences in performance. The current study adds to both lines of research by examining the impact of education and experience on one of the core features of the police role: the use of coercion. The findings indicate that varying levels of education and experience are related to differences in the use of coercion in encounters with citizens. Encounters involving officers with any college education result in significantly less verbal force compared to those with a high school education. However, only those encounters involving officers with a 4-year degree result in significantly less physical force. Finally, encounters involving officers with greater experience result in less verbal and physical force.

KW - Coercion

KW - College education

KW - Experience

KW - Police

KW - Use of force

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846466422&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846466422&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0093854806290239

DO - 10.1177/0093854806290239

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33846466422

VL - 34

SP - 179

EP - 196

JO - Criminal Justice and Behavior

JF - Criminal Justice and Behavior

SN - 0093-8548

IS - 2

ER -