Plasma production of nanodevice-grade semiconductor nanocrystals

Zachary Holman, U. R. Kortshagen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) offer new opportunities for optical and electronic devices ranging from single-electron transistors to large-area solar cells. Solution synthesis methods cannot reach the temperatures necessary to produce crystalline nanoparticles of covalently bonded materials, and most gas-phase techniques suffer from particle agglomeration and sintering. Nonthermal plasma synthesis, however, can produce high-quality NCs of key materials such as Si and Ge. In this review, we examine the current state and future challenges of the growing field of plasma-synthesized NCs from a device applications perspective. We identify NC microstructure, morphology, ensemble monodispersity, surface chemistry and doping as being vital to the success of next-generation devices, and we discuss research opportunities to understand and control these properties during plasma synthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number174009
JournalJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume44
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plasma sources
Nanocrystals
grade
nanocrystals
Semiconductor materials
Plasmas
synthesis
Single electron transistors
single electron transistors
agglomeration
Surface chemistry
Solar cells
sintering
Sintering
Agglomeration
solar cells
Gases
Doping (additives)
chemistry
vapor phases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Plasma production of nanodevice-grade semiconductor nanocrystals. / Holman, Zachary; Kortshagen, U. R.

In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol. 44, No. 17, 174009, 04.05.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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