Planning for hazard mitigation in the U.S.–mexican border region

An assessment of hazardous waste generation rates for transportation

Subhrajit Guhathakurta, David Pijawka, Suleiman Ashur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper provides an assessment of the trends in hazardous waste shipments across the U.S.–Mexican border. These wastes are generated in the maquiladoras (assembly plants) operating in the northern border of Mexico and are expected to be shipped back to the United States under the conditions imposed by the Environmental Cooperation Agreement. However, very little of such waste is actually sent back. This study first estimates generation rates for hazardous waste, based on shipment data, by type of maquiladora industry for 1995 and prior years. Second, it uses Sonora, Mexico, as a case to illustrate the impending problems of waste transportation and treatment by projecting hazardous waste shipments to 2005. The paper concludes with some suggested research to address the current policy impasse in managing hazardous wastes in the U.S.–Mexican border.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-90
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Borderlands Studies
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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hazardous waste
border region
mitigation
hazard
planning
maquiladora
Mexico
rate
industry
trend
border

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Law

Cite this

Planning for hazard mitigation in the U.S.–mexican border region : An assessment of hazardous waste generation rates for transportation. / Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Pijawka, David; Ashur, Suleiman.

In: Journal of Borderlands Studies, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 75-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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