Pinto bean consumption reduces biomarkers for heart disease risk

Donna M. Winham, Andrea M. Hutchins, Carol S. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To determine effects of daily intake of 1/2 cup pinto beans, black-eyed peas or carrots (placebo) on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in free-living, mildly insulin resistant adults over an 8 week period. Methods: Randomized, crossover 3 X 3 block design. Sixteen participants (7 men, 9 women) received each treatment for eight-weeks with two-week washouts. Fasting blood samples collected at beginning and end of periods were analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, insulin, glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. Results: A significant treatment-by-time effect impacted serum TC (p = 0.026) and LDL (p = 0.033) after eight weeks. Paired t-tests indicated that pinto beans were responsible for this effect (p = 0.003; p = 0.008). Mean change of serum TC for pinto bean, black-eyed pea and placebo were -19 ± 5, 2.5 ± 6, and 1 ± 5 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.011). Mean change of serum LDL-C for pinto bean, black-eyed pea and placebo were -14 ± 4, 4 ± 5, and 1 ± 4 mg/dL, in that order (p = 0.013). Pinto beans differed significantly from placebo (p = 0.021). No significant differences were seen with other blood concentrations across the 3 treatment periods. Conclusions: Pinto bean intake should be encouraged to lower serum TC and LDL-C, thereby reducing risk for CHD.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages243-249
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume26
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2007

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pinto beans
heart diseases
Heart Diseases
biomarkers
Peas
Biomarkers
Cholesterol
Placebos
LDL Cholesterol
blood serum
placebos
Serum
low density lipoprotein cholesterol
cholesterol
cowpeas
Coronary Disease
Insulin
Daucus carota
C-Reactive Protein
HDL Cholesterol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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Pinto bean consumption reduces biomarkers for heart disease risk. / Winham, Donna M.; Hutchins, Andrea M.; Johnston, Carol S.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 26, No. 3, 06.2007, p. 243-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To determine effects of daily intake of 1/2 cup pinto beans, black-eyed peas or carrots (placebo) on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in free-living, mildly insulin resistant adults over an 8 week period. Methods: Randomized, crossover 3 X 3 block design. Sixteen participants (7 men, 9 women) received each treatment for eight-weeks with two-week washouts. Fasting blood samples collected at beginning and end of periods were analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, insulin, glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. Results: A significant treatment-by-time effect impacted serum TC (p = 0.026) and LDL (p = 0.033) after eight weeks. Paired t-tests indicated that pinto beans were responsible for this effect (p = 0.003; p = 0.008). Mean change of serum TC for pinto bean, black-eyed pea and placebo were -19 ± 5, 2.5 ± 6, and 1 ± 5 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.011). Mean change of serum LDL-C for pinto bean, black-eyed pea and placebo were -14 ± 4, 4 ± 5, and 1 ± 4 mg/dL, in that order (p = 0.013). Pinto beans differed significantly from placebo (p = 0.021). No significant differences were seen with other blood concentrations across the 3 treatment periods. Conclusions: Pinto bean intake should be encouraged to lower serum TC and LDL-C, thereby reducing risk for CHD.",
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N2 - Objective: To determine effects of daily intake of 1/2 cup pinto beans, black-eyed peas or carrots (placebo) on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in free-living, mildly insulin resistant adults over an 8 week period. Methods: Randomized, crossover 3 X 3 block design. Sixteen participants (7 men, 9 women) received each treatment for eight-weeks with two-week washouts. Fasting blood samples collected at beginning and end of periods were analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, insulin, glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. Results: A significant treatment-by-time effect impacted serum TC (p = 0.026) and LDL (p = 0.033) after eight weeks. Paired t-tests indicated that pinto beans were responsible for this effect (p = 0.003; p = 0.008). Mean change of serum TC for pinto bean, black-eyed pea and placebo were -19 ± 5, 2.5 ± 6, and 1 ± 5 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.011). Mean change of serum LDL-C for pinto bean, black-eyed pea and placebo were -14 ± 4, 4 ± 5, and 1 ± 4 mg/dL, in that order (p = 0.013). Pinto beans differed significantly from placebo (p = 0.021). No significant differences were seen with other blood concentrations across the 3 treatment periods. Conclusions: Pinto bean intake should be encouraged to lower serum TC and LDL-C, thereby reducing risk for CHD.

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