Pilot Trial of a Home-based Physical Activity Program for African American Women

Dori Pekmezi, Cole Ainsworth, Rodney Joseph, Victoria Williams, Renee Desmond, Karen Meneses, Bess Marcus, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose This study aimed to assess the feasibility of a Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print (HIPP) intervention for African American women in the Deep South. Methods A pilot randomized trial of the HIPP intervention (N = 43) versus wellness contact control (N = 41) was conducted. Recruitment, retention, and adherence were examined, along with physical activity (7-d physical activity recalls, accelerometers) and related psychosocial variables at baseline and 6 months. Results The sample included 84 overweight/obese African American women 50-69 yr old in Birmingham, AL. Retention was high at 6 months (90%). Most participants reported being satisfied with the HIPP program and finding it helpful (91.67%). There were no significant between-group differences in physical activity (P = 0.22); however, HIPP participants reported larger increases (mean of +73.9 min·wk-1 (SD 90.9)) in moderate-intensity or greater physical activity from baseline to 6 months compared with the control group (+41.5 min·wk-1 (64.4)). The HIPP group also reported significantly greater improvements in physical activity goal setting (P = 0.02) and enjoyment (P = 0.04) from baseline to 6 months compared with the control group. There were no other significant between-group differences (6-min walk test, weight, physical activity planning, behavioral processes, stage of change); however, trends in the data for cognitive processes, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and family support for physical activity indicated small improvements for HIPP participants (P > 0.05) and declines for control participants. Significant decreases in decisional balance (P = 0.01) and friend support (P = 0.03) from baseline to 6 months were observed in the control arm and not the intervention arm. Conclusions The HIPP intervention has great potential as a low-cost, high-reach method for reducing physical activity-related health disparities. The lack of improvement in some domains may indicate that additional resources are needed to help this target population reach national guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2528-2536
Number of pages9
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume49
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

African Americans
Exercise
Control Groups
Health Services Needs and Demand
Self Efficacy

Keywords

  • Behavior Change
  • Cancer Prevention
  • Health Disparities
  • Physical Activity
  • Women's Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Pekmezi, D., Ainsworth, C., Joseph, R., Williams, V., Desmond, R., Meneses, K., ... Demark-Wahnefried, W. (2017). Pilot Trial of a Home-based Physical Activity Program for African American Women. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 49(12), 2528-2536. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000001370

Pilot Trial of a Home-based Physical Activity Program for African American Women. / Pekmezi, Dori; Ainsworth, Cole; Joseph, Rodney; Williams, Victoria; Desmond, Renee; Meneses, Karen; Marcus, Bess; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 49, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 2528-2536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pekmezi, D, Ainsworth, C, Joseph, R, Williams, V, Desmond, R, Meneses, K, Marcus, B & Demark-Wahnefried, W 2017, 'Pilot Trial of a Home-based Physical Activity Program for African American Women', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 49, no. 12, pp. 2528-2536. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000001370
Pekmezi, Dori ; Ainsworth, Cole ; Joseph, Rodney ; Williams, Victoria ; Desmond, Renee ; Meneses, Karen ; Marcus, Bess ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy. / Pilot Trial of a Home-based Physical Activity Program for African American Women. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 12. pp. 2528-2536.
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