Pilot study of a moderate dose multivitamin/mineral supplement for children with autistic spectrum disorder

James Adams, Charles Holloway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Determine the effect of a moderate dose multivitamin/mineral supplement on children with autistic spectrum disorder. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 3-month study. Subjects: Twenty (20) children with autistic spectrum disorder, ages 3-8 years. Results: A Global Impressions parental questionnaire found that the supplement group reported statistically significant improvements in sleep and gastrointestinal problems compared to the placebo group. An evaluation of vitamin B6 levels prior to the study found that the autistic children had substantially elevated levels of B6 compared to a control group of typical children (75% higher, p < 0.0000001). Vitamin C levels were measured at the end of the study, and the placebo group had levels that were significantly below average for typical children, whereas the supplement group had near-average levels. Discussion: The finding of high vitamin B6 levels is consistent with recent reports of low levels of pyridoxal-5-phosphate and low activity of pyridoxal kinase (i.e., pyridoxal is only poorly converted to pyridoxal-5-phosphate, the enzymatically active form). This may explain the functional need for high-dose vitamin B6 supplementation in many children and adults with autism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1033-1039
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

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Autistic Disorder
Minerals
Vitamin B 6
Pyridoxal Phosphate
Placebos
Pyridoxal Kinase
Pyridoxal
Ascorbic Acid
Sleep
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Pilot study of a moderate dose multivitamin/mineral supplement for children with autistic spectrum disorder. / Adams, James; Holloway, Charles.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 6, 12.2004, p. 1033-1039.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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