Physical Education Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions About Preparation for Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Physical educators may be the responsible people for implementing comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAPs) in schools. However, it is unclear whether physical education teacher education (PETE) programs provide the relevant learning opportunities to preservice teachers for CSPAP implementation. The purpose of this study was to understand preservice teachers’ perspectives and experiences of CSPAP preparation in their PETE programs. Method: Fourteen PETE students from 6 different universities participated and shared their experiences in PETE programs. Data were collected through a short survey, 1 formal interview, field images, document gathering, and an additional survey to follow up the interview. Descriptive statistics, constant comparison, and analytic induction techniques were used to analyze the data. Results: Participants’ familiarity with CSPAPs was related to positive opinions about the role of physical educators in CSPAPs. Three common themes were revealed: (a) introducing CSPAP via courses, (b) the lack of programwide hands-on experiences for CSPAP, and (c) limited preparation for social skills with stakeholders. Participants’ perceptions of the role of physical educators as physical activity leaders had been expanded during their training. Conclusion: The participating PETE programs integrated CSPAP components in the existing courses to introduce CSPAP, while there was a lack of sufficient practical opportunities to learn how to implement (aspects of) a CSPAP. Participants felt they were insufficiently prepared to promote and implement expanded physical activity programming beyond physical education classes in schools. The majority of the PETE preservice teachers wanted more practical CSPAP experiences in their programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 1 2018

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Physical Education and Training
Exercise
Interviews
Teacher Training

Keywords

  • Physical activity promotion
  • physical education teacher education programs
  • qualitative research
  • student teachers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nephrology

Cite this

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title = "Physical Education Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions About Preparation for Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs",
abstract = "Purpose: Physical educators may be the responsible people for implementing comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAPs) in schools. However, it is unclear whether physical education teacher education (PETE) programs provide the relevant learning opportunities to preservice teachers for CSPAP implementation. The purpose of this study was to understand preservice teachers’ perspectives and experiences of CSPAP preparation in their PETE programs. Method: Fourteen PETE students from 6 different universities participated and shared their experiences in PETE programs. Data were collected through a short survey, 1 formal interview, field images, document gathering, and an additional survey to follow up the interview. Descriptive statistics, constant comparison, and analytic induction techniques were used to analyze the data. Results: Participants’ familiarity with CSPAPs was related to positive opinions about the role of physical educators in CSPAPs. Three common themes were revealed: (a) introducing CSPAP via courses, (b) the lack of programwide hands-on experiences for CSPAP, and (c) limited preparation for social skills with stakeholders. Participants’ perceptions of the role of physical educators as physical activity leaders had been expanded during their training. Conclusion: The participating PETE programs integrated CSPAP components in the existing courses to introduce CSPAP, while there was a lack of sufficient practical opportunities to learn how to implement (aspects of) a CSPAP. Participants felt they were insufficiently prepared to promote and implement expanded physical activity programming beyond physical education classes in schools. The majority of the PETE preservice teachers wanted more practical CSPAP experiences in their programs.",
keywords = "Physical activity promotion, physical education teacher education programs, qualitative research, student teachers",
author = "Kwon, {Ja Youn} and Pamela Kulinna and {Van Der Mars}, Hans and Mirka Koro-Ljungberg and Audrey Beardsley and Jason Norris",
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