Physical activity, physical fitness, and framingham 10-year risk score: The cross-cultural activity participation study

M. J. LaMonte, J. L. Durstine, C. L. Addy, M. L. Irwin, Barbara Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

■ PURPOSE: Although physical activity and physical fitness are inversely and causally associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, available equations for estimating CHD risk do not include scores for activity or fitness. Therefore, this study evaluated the association of physical fitness and moderate-intensity physical activity with the 10-year Framingham CHD risk estimate. ■ METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses were performed on data from 137 healthy middle-aged women (53.9±9.9 yr; 28.3±6.0 kg/m2). Health histories, body composition, blood pressure, and blood samples were obtained from a clinical examination. Levels of moderate (3-6 METS) intensity physical activity, expressed as MET-minutes/day of energy expenditure, were derived from multiple 24-hour physical activity records. Physical fitness was quantified as duration of a symptom-limited maximal treadmill exercise test. ■ RESULTS: After adjustment for race, body mass index (BMI), and hormone replacement status, a graded reduction in the Framingham risk score was observed across low (5.8%), moderate (4.0%), and high (3.6%) fitness levels (P for trend=0.009). Women in both the moderate and high fitness categories had a lower (P<0.01) risk score compared with their low fit counterparts. Significant differences in risk were not seen among low (3.9%), moderate (4.9%), and high (4.4%) physical activity groups. The lack of association between the risk score by physical activity may have been due to the homogeneity of activity levels among participants. Our findings reinforce existing data that show enhanced levels of fitness are associated with lower risk for CHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-70
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
Volume21
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Exercise
Coronary Disease
Exercise Test
Body Composition
Energy Metabolism
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hormones
Blood Pressure
Morbidity
Mortality
Health

Keywords

  • CHD risk
  • Exercise
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Physical activity, physical fitness, and framingham 10-year risk score : The cross-cultural activity participation study. / LaMonte, M. J.; Durstine, J. L.; Addy, C. L.; Irwin, M. L.; Ainsworth, Barbara.

In: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2001, p. 63-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

LaMonte, M. J. ; Durstine, J. L. ; Addy, C. L. ; Irwin, M. L. ; Ainsworth, Barbara. / Physical activity, physical fitness, and framingham 10-year risk score : The cross-cultural activity participation study. In: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation. 2001 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 63-70.
@article{90338830a96d4218b12525013d45f03e,
title = "Physical activity, physical fitness, and framingham 10-year risk score: The cross-cultural activity participation study",
abstract = "■ PURPOSE: Although physical activity and physical fitness are inversely and causally associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, available equations for estimating CHD risk do not include scores for activity or fitness. Therefore, this study evaluated the association of physical fitness and moderate-intensity physical activity with the 10-year Framingham CHD risk estimate. ■ METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses were performed on data from 137 healthy middle-aged women (53.9±9.9 yr; 28.3±6.0 kg/m2). Health histories, body composition, blood pressure, and blood samples were obtained from a clinical examination. Levels of moderate (3-6 METS) intensity physical activity, expressed as MET-minutes/day of energy expenditure, were derived from multiple 24-hour physical activity records. Physical fitness was quantified as duration of a symptom-limited maximal treadmill exercise test. ■ RESULTS: After adjustment for race, body mass index (BMI), and hormone replacement status, a graded reduction in the Framingham risk score was observed across low (5.8{\%}), moderate (4.0{\%}), and high (3.6{\%}) fitness levels (P for trend=0.009). Women in both the moderate and high fitness categories had a lower (P<0.01) risk score compared with their low fit counterparts. Significant differences in risk were not seen among low (3.9{\%}), moderate (4.9{\%}), and high (4.4{\%}) physical activity groups. The lack of association between the risk score by physical activity may have been due to the homogeneity of activity levels among participants. Our findings reinforce existing data that show enhanced levels of fitness are associated with lower risk for CHD.",
keywords = "CHD risk, Exercise, Women",
author = "LaMonte, {M. J.} and Durstine, {J. L.} and Addy, {C. L.} and Irwin, {M. L.} and Barbara Ainsworth",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "63--70",
journal = "Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention",
issn = "1932-7501",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical activity, physical fitness, and framingham 10-year risk score

T2 - The cross-cultural activity participation study

AU - LaMonte, M. J.

AU - Durstine, J. L.

AU - Addy, C. L.

AU - Irwin, M. L.

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - ■ PURPOSE: Although physical activity and physical fitness are inversely and causally associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, available equations for estimating CHD risk do not include scores for activity or fitness. Therefore, this study evaluated the association of physical fitness and moderate-intensity physical activity with the 10-year Framingham CHD risk estimate. ■ METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses were performed on data from 137 healthy middle-aged women (53.9±9.9 yr; 28.3±6.0 kg/m2). Health histories, body composition, blood pressure, and blood samples were obtained from a clinical examination. Levels of moderate (3-6 METS) intensity physical activity, expressed as MET-minutes/day of energy expenditure, were derived from multiple 24-hour physical activity records. Physical fitness was quantified as duration of a symptom-limited maximal treadmill exercise test. ■ RESULTS: After adjustment for race, body mass index (BMI), and hormone replacement status, a graded reduction in the Framingham risk score was observed across low (5.8%), moderate (4.0%), and high (3.6%) fitness levels (P for trend=0.009). Women in both the moderate and high fitness categories had a lower (P<0.01) risk score compared with their low fit counterparts. Significant differences in risk were not seen among low (3.9%), moderate (4.9%), and high (4.4%) physical activity groups. The lack of association between the risk score by physical activity may have been due to the homogeneity of activity levels among participants. Our findings reinforce existing data that show enhanced levels of fitness are associated with lower risk for CHD.

AB - ■ PURPOSE: Although physical activity and physical fitness are inversely and causally associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, available equations for estimating CHD risk do not include scores for activity or fitness. Therefore, this study evaluated the association of physical fitness and moderate-intensity physical activity with the 10-year Framingham CHD risk estimate. ■ METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses were performed on data from 137 healthy middle-aged women (53.9±9.9 yr; 28.3±6.0 kg/m2). Health histories, body composition, blood pressure, and blood samples were obtained from a clinical examination. Levels of moderate (3-6 METS) intensity physical activity, expressed as MET-minutes/day of energy expenditure, were derived from multiple 24-hour physical activity records. Physical fitness was quantified as duration of a symptom-limited maximal treadmill exercise test. ■ RESULTS: After adjustment for race, body mass index (BMI), and hormone replacement status, a graded reduction in the Framingham risk score was observed across low (5.8%), moderate (4.0%), and high (3.6%) fitness levels (P for trend=0.009). Women in both the moderate and high fitness categories had a lower (P<0.01) risk score compared with their low fit counterparts. Significant differences in risk were not seen among low (3.9%), moderate (4.9%), and high (4.4%) physical activity groups. The lack of association between the risk score by physical activity may have been due to the homogeneity of activity levels among participants. Our findings reinforce existing data that show enhanced levels of fitness are associated with lower risk for CHD.

KW - CHD risk

KW - Exercise

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035072319&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035072319&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11314285

AN - SCOPUS:0035072319

VL - 21

SP - 63

EP - 70

JO - Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

JF - Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

SN - 1932-7501

IS - 2

ER -