Physical activity, benefits, and barriers across the aging continuum

Chanam Shin, Young Shin Lee, Michael Belyea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A growing body of evidence indicates the importance of physical activity during midlife period linked to the likelihood of healthy aging, while the likelihood of an individual engaging in physical activity depends largely on their perceived benefits and barriers to being physically active. Aim: This study was to examine physical activity levels of midlife Korean American adults and their perceived benefits and barriers to physical activity compared with young and older adults. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of data collected for a larger descriptive, cross-sectional study that was conducted with a sample of 517 Korean American adults in a Midwestern city. Data were collected using a survey questionnaire. Results: A little more than half of the sample were women (57.1%), with a mean age of 41.6 (± 13.4). The study sample met the current guidelines for physical activity far less than the general U.S. population (30.4% -34.6 vs. 51.7%). Less midlife adults met the guidelines for moderate-intensity physical activity than older adults (34.2% vs. 57.4%), while less midlife adults met the guidelines for vigorous-intensity physical activity than young adults (24.8% vs. 40.6%). Midlife adults perceived fewer benefits than did young and older adults. Conclusion: The findings indicate that midlife adults are less likely to engage in physical activity and probably more at risk for unhealthy ageing than young and older adults. Understanding benefits and barriers of target population is the first step in developing culturally and age-appropriate intervention to promote physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-112
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Architectural Accessibility
Exercise
Young Adult
Asian Americans
Guidelines
Health Services Needs and Demand
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Benefits
  • Korean Americans
  • Midlife
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Physical activity, benefits, and barriers across the aging continuum. / Shin, Chanam; Lee, Young Shin; Belyea, Michael.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 44, 01.12.2018, p. 107-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shin, Chanam ; Lee, Young Shin ; Belyea, Michael. / Physical activity, benefits, and barriers across the aging continuum. In: Applied Nursing Research. 2018 ; Vol. 44. pp. 107-112.
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