Physical activity among certified health education specialists

Mary K. Dinger, John Massie, Lynda Ransdell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the self-reported physical activity behavior of a randomly selected sample of certified health education specialists (CHESs) in the United States. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. The independent variables were gender, race, exercise physiology course experience, exercise prescription course experience, and education. The dependent variables were total physical activity (TPA) and total physical activity excluding household activities, stair climbing, and lawn work (PA excluding HSL). Stratified random sampling was used to select 1,000 CHESs who received the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study Physical Activity Questionnaire through the U.S. mail. A total of 540 (54%) surveys were returned. Household activities (91.8%), stair climbing (84.8%), and walking (73.0%) were the most frequently reported physical activities. There were no statistically significant differences in TPA among or between the various groups. Significant differences in PA excluding HSL were found by gender (men > women), exercise physiology course work (course work > no course work), exercise prescription course work (course work > no course work), and education (doctoral > master and/or bachelor). In addition, the majority of CHESs (89%, n = 475) met the Surgeon General's recommendation by expending at least 1000 kcal per week in TPA. CHES subjects were very active compared with the average American adult.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-104
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Health Education
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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