Phoenix debris-flow hazard assessment: House location matters

Matthew Moore, Gregory Kraetz, Ronald Dorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three catchments that debouch into Phoenix housing developments from the Ma Ha Tuak Range, South Mountain show a consistent pattern of declines in the magnitude of debris flows over time. We used a mix of field and geospatial methods to estimate volume, and the varnish microlamination technique to estimate minimum ages of debris deposits. Estimates of debris-flow volumes show a drop of more than two orders of magnitude from latest Pleistocene to 20th century or Little Ice Age. Debris-flow run-out lengths also shortened tremendously, with the most recent events stopping inside incised channels. In contrast, a catchment above houses in the Gila Range, South Mountain, where houses were built very close to the debris-flow source area, reveals an increase in debris-flow magnitude over time. These contrasting findings emphasize the importance of the location of home sites with respect to the debris-flow system in the type of small desert mountain catchments that interface with the sprawling urbanism found in Southwestern USA deserts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-513
Number of pages23
JournalPhysical Geography
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Fingerprint

hazard assessment
debris flow
catchment
mountain
desert
ice flow
Pleistocene

Keywords

  • Arizona
  • debris flow
  • hazard assessment
  • Phoenix
  • rock varnish microlamination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Phoenix debris-flow hazard assessment : House location matters. / Moore, Matthew; Kraetz, Gregory; Dorn, Ronald.

In: Physical Geography, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.11.2012, p. 491-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, Matthew ; Kraetz, Gregory ; Dorn, Ronald. / Phoenix debris-flow hazard assessment : House location matters. In: Physical Geography. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 491-513.
@article{f6b8fe2241a041659ca78b76d6b7fb7b,
title = "Phoenix debris-flow hazard assessment: House location matters",
abstract = "Three catchments that debouch into Phoenix housing developments from the Ma Ha Tuak Range, South Mountain show a consistent pattern of declines in the magnitude of debris flows over time. We used a mix of field and geospatial methods to estimate volume, and the varnish microlamination technique to estimate minimum ages of debris deposits. Estimates of debris-flow volumes show a drop of more than two orders of magnitude from latest Pleistocene to 20th century or Little Ice Age. Debris-flow run-out lengths also shortened tremendously, with the most recent events stopping inside incised channels. In contrast, a catchment above houses in the Gila Range, South Mountain, where houses were built very close to the debris-flow source area, reveals an increase in debris-flow magnitude over time. These contrasting findings emphasize the importance of the location of home sites with respect to the debris-flow system in the type of small desert mountain catchments that interface with the sprawling urbanism found in Southwestern USA deserts.",
keywords = "Arizona, debris flow, hazard assessment, Phoenix, rock varnish microlamination",
author = "Matthew Moore and Gregory Kraetz and Ronald Dorn",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2747/0272-3646.33.6.491",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "491--513",
journal = "Physical Geography",
issn = "0272-3646",
publisher = "Bellwether Publishing, Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phoenix debris-flow hazard assessment

T2 - House location matters

AU - Moore, Matthew

AU - Kraetz, Gregory

AU - Dorn, Ronald

PY - 2012/11/1

Y1 - 2012/11/1

N2 - Three catchments that debouch into Phoenix housing developments from the Ma Ha Tuak Range, South Mountain show a consistent pattern of declines in the magnitude of debris flows over time. We used a mix of field and geospatial methods to estimate volume, and the varnish microlamination technique to estimate minimum ages of debris deposits. Estimates of debris-flow volumes show a drop of more than two orders of magnitude from latest Pleistocene to 20th century or Little Ice Age. Debris-flow run-out lengths also shortened tremendously, with the most recent events stopping inside incised channels. In contrast, a catchment above houses in the Gila Range, South Mountain, where houses were built very close to the debris-flow source area, reveals an increase in debris-flow magnitude over time. These contrasting findings emphasize the importance of the location of home sites with respect to the debris-flow system in the type of small desert mountain catchments that interface with the sprawling urbanism found in Southwestern USA deserts.

AB - Three catchments that debouch into Phoenix housing developments from the Ma Ha Tuak Range, South Mountain show a consistent pattern of declines in the magnitude of debris flows over time. We used a mix of field and geospatial methods to estimate volume, and the varnish microlamination technique to estimate minimum ages of debris deposits. Estimates of debris-flow volumes show a drop of more than two orders of magnitude from latest Pleistocene to 20th century or Little Ice Age. Debris-flow run-out lengths also shortened tremendously, with the most recent events stopping inside incised channels. In contrast, a catchment above houses in the Gila Range, South Mountain, where houses were built very close to the debris-flow source area, reveals an increase in debris-flow magnitude over time. These contrasting findings emphasize the importance of the location of home sites with respect to the debris-flow system in the type of small desert mountain catchments that interface with the sprawling urbanism found in Southwestern USA deserts.

KW - Arizona

KW - debris flow

KW - hazard assessment

KW - Phoenix

KW - rock varnish microlamination

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84870587588&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84870587588&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2747/0272-3646.33.6.491

DO - 10.2747/0272-3646.33.6.491

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84870587588

VL - 33

SP - 491

EP - 513

JO - Physical Geography

JF - Physical Geography

SN - 0272-3646

IS - 6

ER -