Phase change materials as thermal storage for high performance homes

Kevin R. Campbell, David Sailor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A minimally invasive method of adding thermal mass to a building is to apply Phase Change Material (PCM) to the interior of the structure. This paper describes a simulation-based approach for informing the integration of PCM in high performance homes without mechanical cooling. The analysis considers phase change transition temperature, quantity, and location of PCM within the building. The effectiveness of each test case was determined based on the number of hours that the indoor conditions were outside the ASHRAE defined comfort zone. Results showed that for most climates a PCM melt temperature of 25°C yielded the largest increases in occupant comfort; however the magnitudes of increases in occupant comfort were highly climate dependant. Reductions of 93% of zone-hours and 98% of zone-degree-hours outside the thermal comfort were achieved for simulations in Portland, Oregon. However, reductions of only 6.4% of zone-hours and 7.3% of zone-degree-hours outside the thermal comfort zone were realized in Phoenix, Arizona.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011
Pages809-818
Number of pages10
Volume4
EditionPARTS A AND B
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011 - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2011Nov 17 2011

Other

OtherASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period11/11/1111/17/11

Fingerprint

Phase change materials
Thermal comfort
Superconducting transition temperature
Cooling
Hot Temperature
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Campbell, K. R., & Sailor, D. (2011). Phase change materials as thermal storage for high performance homes. In ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011 (PARTS A AND B ed., Vol. 4, pp. 809-818)

Phase change materials as thermal storage for high performance homes. / Campbell, Kevin R.; Sailor, David.

ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011. Vol. 4 PARTS A AND B. ed. 2011. p. 809-818.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Campbell, KR & Sailor, D 2011, Phase change materials as thermal storage for high performance homes. in ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011. PARTS A AND B edn, vol. 4, pp. 809-818, ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011, Denver, CO, United States, 11/11/11.
Campbell KR, Sailor D. Phase change materials as thermal storage for high performance homes. In ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011. PARTS A AND B ed. Vol. 4. 2011. p. 809-818
Campbell, Kevin R. ; Sailor, David. / Phase change materials as thermal storage for high performance homes. ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2011. Vol. 4 PARTS A AND B. ed. 2011. pp. 809-818
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