Perspectives on a freshman treatment of electronic systems

John Robertson, Sarah Roux, Vivek Ramanathan, Mark Rager

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The conventional approach to curriculum design is that students start with the basics of science and math and gradually progress towards a realistic integration of all their engineering skills in a senior capstone project. That approach is now challenged by changes in the assumed boundary conditions. Students no longer progress through the program in lock-step. Electronics applications have evolved far beyond the components level and many cross-disciplinary skills are needed. Finally, all students require a level of communications, team-working, trouble-shooting and representational skills that take a long time to mature so it is too late to wait till the senior year to introduce them. The paper presents a combined student-faculty appraisal of an alternative approach that covers these issues within the context of systems projects as the core of a 3-credit freshman class. The outcomes affirmed that a freshman group could analyze complex systems and that it is a good way to stimulate interest in electronics as a career.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

    Fingerprint

    Students
    Electronic equipment
    Curricula
    Large scale systems
    Boundary conditions
    Communication

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Perspectives on a freshman treatment of electronic systems. / Robertson, John; Roux, Sarah; Ramanathan, Vivek; Rager, Mark.

    In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 01.01.2008.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Robertson, John ; Roux, Sarah ; Ramanathan, Vivek ; Rager, Mark. / Perspectives on a freshman treatment of electronic systems. In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2008.
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