Persons with and without Down syndrome use similar strategies when using visual instructions for bimanual drumming

Shannon Ringenbach, G. M. Mulvey, C. Beachy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Previous research suggested that persons with Down syndrome (DS) used a different strategy to drum than typical adults. Methods: The present study examined continuous bimanual drumming strategies in response to different instructions in 10 persons with DS, 10 mental age-matched and 10 chronological age-matched groups. The drumming task required participants to hit two drums with the drumsticks at the same time following verbal (e.g. 'up' and 'down'), visual (e.g. video of both drumsticks moving up and down together) or auditory (e.g. sound of both drums being hit, then cymbal being hit) instructions for 10 s. Sensors placed on the wrists of each participant and the end of each drumstick provided data that allowed the assessment of individual drumming strategies. Results: In general, when persons with DS were following the visual instructions their drumming movements were shorter, straighter and less variable as compared with their movements in the auditory and verbal conditions. Conclusions: Whether movement paths were straight or curved, the strategy was to move the drumstick and wrist together as one unit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-961
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume51
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Keywords

  • Bimanual coordination
  • Down syndrome
  • Drumming
  • Instructions
  • Strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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