Personal Goals and Interpersonal Support and Hindrance as Factors in Psychological Distress and Well-Being

Linda S. Ruehlman, Sharlene Wolchik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

146 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined psychological distress and well-being as a function of the characteristics of personal projects and project-relevant social support and social hindrance provided by the three most important people in subjects' lives. Three project factors (Project Mastery, Strain, and Self-Involvement) were found to account for significant variation in both psychological distress and well-being. Project support was generally found to be significantly related to well-being, but not to distress. However, project hindrance was found to be significantly related to both distress and well-being. Additional analyses revealed that the behavior of the most important person in a subject's life is of special significance in accounting for variations in psychological distress and well-being. Finally, evidence of the independence of support and hindrance was observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-301
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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