Permanent coverage of large burn wounds with autologous cultured human epithelium

G. G. Gallico, N. E. O'Connor, Carolyn Compton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

980 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When burns are so extensive that skin grafts obtainable from remaining donor sites are insufficient to provide wound coverage, a new source of autograft must be found. Human epidermal cells from a small skin-biopsy sample can be cultured to produce coherent epithelial sheets sufficient to cover the entire body surface. When this epithelium was applied to wounds on athymic mice it generated a human epidermis. Autologous cultured epithelium placed on small burn wounds in adults and children adhered and generated a permanent epidermis similar to that resulting from split-thickness skin grafts. We report here that in two children who sustained burns on more than 95 per cent of their bodies, half or more of the body surface was successfully covered with cultured epithelial autografts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)448-451
Number of pages4
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume311
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Epithelium
Autografts
Burns
Epidermis
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Transplants
Nude Mice
Tissue Donors
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Permanent coverage of large burn wounds with autologous cultured human epithelium. / Gallico, G. G.; O'Connor, N. E.; Compton, Carolyn.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 311, No. 7, 1984, p. 448-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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