Perceptions, Uses of, and Interests in Complementary Health Care Approaches in Depressed Pregnant Women: The PAW Survey

Jennifer Matthews, Jennifer Huberty, Jenn A. Leiferman, Darya McClain, Linda Larkey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression affects up to 23% of pregnant women and is associated with adverse physical/mental health outcomes for both the mother and baby. Depressed pregnant women may be more likely to engage in unhealthy lifestyle behaviors that contribute to an increased risk for chronic disease. Little is known regarding depressed pregnant women’s perceptions, uses of, and interests in complementary health approaches. Study participants (mean age 28.7 ± 6.8; n = 1032) included pregnant women ≥8 weeks gestation who responded to a survey assessing physical and mental health and wellness practices. Of those completing the survey, depressed pregnant women (n = 272) had significantly higher levels of anxiety (P <.001) and stress (P <.001) and had poorer sleep quality (P <.001), mindfulness (P <.001), and social support (P <.001) compared to nondepressed pregnant women (n = 760). A majority (84%) of depressed pregnant women would consider using a complementary health approach for weight and/or stress management during pregnancy, and more than 50% were interested in yoga.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-95
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • complementary and alternative medicine
  • depression
  • pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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