Perceptions of risk and adaptation: Coffee producers, market shocks, and extreme weather in Central America and Mexico

Catherine M. Tucker, Hallie Eakin, Edwin J. Castellanos

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    134 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This article explores the role of risk perception in adaptation to stress through comparative case studies of coffee farmers' responses to climatic and non-climatic stressors. We hypothesized that farmers associating these changes with high risk would be more likely to make adaptations than those who saw the events as part of normal variation. Nevertheless, we found that farmers who associated events with high risk were not more likely to engage in specific adaptations. Adaptive responses were more clearly associated with access to land than perception of risk, suggesting that adaptation is more a function of exogenous constraints on decision making than perception.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)23-32
    Number of pages10
    JournalGlobal Environmental Change
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

    Keywords

    • Adaptive capacity
    • Central America
    • Coffee
    • Extreme weather
    • Market shocks
    • Mexico
    • Risk perception

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Global and Planetary Change
    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Ecology
    • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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