Perceptions of competence, control, and belongingness over the transition to high school: A mixed-method study

Kathryn R. Wentzel, Robert Tomback, Alexis Williams, Daniel McNeish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study employed a mixed method, longitudinal design to examine adolescent beliefs about their competence, control, and social belongingness (emotional support from teachers and peers) across the transition from middle school (8th grade) to high school (9th grade). Qualitative data based on open-ended questions suggested that students (N = 93; 13–16 year-olds) were mostly concerned with competence-related issues as they transitioned into high school and through the end of 10th grade. Results of path models (N = 160) suggested that self-reported beliefs about competence, control, and belongingness were relatively stable from 8th to 9th grade; eighth-grade perceived competence and belongingness with peers significantly predicted students’ ninth-grade emotional well-being by way of ninth-grade perceived competence and belongingness, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume56
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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