Perceived organizational influences on Western U.S. collegiate athletes’ attitudes toward concussion risks and concussion reporting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper investigates how cultural narratives from people at varying positions in a team culture affect athletes’ attitudes toward concussion injures and concussion reporting. Power Five National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes (N = 226) competing in high-concussion risk sports completed a survey exploring the frequency with which they heard performance or safety narratives from three distinct organizational sources: coaches, Athletic Trainers (ATs), and teammates. Athletes then completed scales measuring perceived immediacy of concussion consequences, perceived probability of suffering short- and long-term consequences of concussions, and three distinct dimensions of attitudes toward concussion-reporting behavior. Regression analyses revealed that both message frequency and source matter to athletes when forming attitudes and perceptions about the concussion-reporting behaviors that universities are advocating. Implications and recommendations for organizations designed to motivate athletes to report concussions to conclude the paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Communication Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • collegiate athletics
  • concussion reporting
  • Cultural narrative
  • organizational influence
  • risk perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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