Perceived organizational influences on Western U.S. collegiate athletes’ attitudes toward concussion risks and concussion reporting

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Abstract

This paper investigates how cultural narratives from people at varying positions in a team culture affect athletes’ attitudes toward concussion injures and concussion reporting. Power Five National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes (N = 226) competing in high-concussion risk sports completed a survey exploring the frequency with which they heard performance or safety narratives from three distinct organizational sources: coaches, Athletic Trainers (ATs), and teammates. Athletes then completed scales measuring perceived immediacy of concussion consequences, perceived probability of suffering short- and long-term consequences of concussions, and three distinct dimensions of attitudes toward concussion-reporting behavior. Regression analyses revealed that both message frequency and source matter to athletes when forming attitudes and perceptions about the concussion-reporting behaviors that universities are advocating. Implications and recommendations for organizations designed to motivate athletes to report concussions to conclude the paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-188
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Applied Communication Research
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Cultural narrative
  • collegiate athletics
  • concussion reporting
  • organizational influence
  • risk perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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