Perceived need for substance abuse treatment among White, Hispanic, and Black juvenile arrestees

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5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to examine racial/ethnic differences with regard to perceived need for treatment among a sample of White, Hispanic, and Black drug-using male juvenile arrestees (N = 9618). Racial/ethnic differences among several predictors (frequent use of drugs, polysubstance use, self-reported dependency, past treatment utilization) were also examined. Our results indicate that while racial/ethnic differences with regard to perceived need for treatment do exist, those within all racial/ethnic groups who admit dependency and/or have had prior treatment experience are more likely to perceive that they need treatment than those who do not. However, significant differences exist between Whites and the other two racial/ethnic groups with regard to self-reported dependency and past treatment utilization. Implications for the study and recommendations for future researchers are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

Keywords

  • Juvenile arrestees
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Substance abuse treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

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