Perceived Discrimination and Substance Use in Hispanic/Latino, African-Born Black, and Southeast Asian Immigrants

Alisia G.T.T. Tran, Richard M. Lee, Diana J. Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present investigation extends epidemiological research on discrimination and substance use to African-born Black, Southeast Asian, and Latino/Hispanic adult immigrants in the Midwest (N = 1,387). Discrimination was perceived by nearly 30% of immigrants in the sample during the past year and was significantly related to cigarette smoking, number of past-month drinking days, and engagement in recent binge drinking in the full sample. For Southeast Asian immigrants, perceived discrimination was significantly related to being a current smoker. For Hispanic/Latino immigrants, perceived discrimination was significantly related to number of past-month drinking days and past-month binge drinking. For African-born Black immigrants, perceived discrimination was related to number of past-month drinking days. As the U.S. population becomes increasingly diverse, these results highlight the importance of recognizing and addressing the widespread and pernicious nature of discrimination for a number of diverse racial/ethnic groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-236
Number of pages11
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • discrimination
  • immigrants
  • mental health
  • racial/ethnic minorities
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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