Perceived determinants of risk for breast cancer and the relations among objective risk, perceived risk, and screening behavior over time.

L. S. Aiken, A. M. Fenaughty, Stephen West, J. J. Johnson, T. L. Luckett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interrelations among perceived risk for breast cancer, objective risk factors, and both breast self-examination (BSE) and mammography screening were examined across two waves of a longitudinal study of breast cancer screening. Participants were a community sample of 335 predominantly White middle-class women, aged 37 to 77, who had not had breast cancer. Factors believed by women to determine their self-rated risk level for breast cancer were investigated. Women held optimistic biases about their own breast cancer risk; they often erroneously attributed their relatively lower perceived risk to personal actions, including mammography screening. Compliance with mammography screening but not BSE recommendations increased over time. Perceived susceptibility to breast cancer was related to both family history and breast symptomatology; early mammography screening was positively related to perceived susceptibility later in time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-50
Number of pages24
JournalWomen's health (Hillsdale, N.J.)
Volume1
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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