Perceived access to self-relevant information mediates judgments of privacy violations in neuromonitoring and other monitoring technologies

D. A. Baker, Nicholas Schweitzer, Evan F. Risko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advances in technology are bringing greater insight into the mind, raising a host of privacy concerns. However, the basic psychological mechanisms underlying the perception of privacy violations are poorly understood. Here, we explore the relation between the perception of privacy violations and access to information related to one's "self." In two studies using demographically diverse samples, we find that privacy violations resulting from various monitoring technologies are mediated by the extent to which the monitoring is thought to provide access to self-relevant information, and generally neuromonitoring did not rate among the more invasive monitoring types. However, brain monitoring was judged to be more of a privacy violation when described as providing access to self-relevant information than when no such access was possible, and control participants did not judge the invasiveness of neuromonitoring any differently than those told it provided no access to self-relevant information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroethics
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Neuroethics
  • Neuromonitoring
  • Privacy
  • Self
  • Self-identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Health Policy
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Perceived access to self-relevant information mediates judgments of privacy violations in neuromonitoring and other monitoring technologies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this