People helping turtles, turtles helping people: Understanding resident attitudes towards sea turtle conservation and opportunities for enhanced community participation in Bahia Magdalena, Mexico

Jesse Senko, Andrew J. Schneller, Julio Solis, Francisco Ollervides, Wallace J. Nichols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Pacific Mexico, all five sea turtle species have declined over the past century due to intense overexploitation of meat and eggs, fisheries bycatch, and degradation of marine and nesting habitats. One of the most heavily impacted areas has been the Baja California peninsula, where sea turtle populations remain historically low despite existing conservation measures that include a complete moratorium on the use of sea turtles, over three decades of widespread protection of nesting beaches, and in-water monitoring of sea turtles at coastal foraging areas. We recognize the need for alternative sea turtle conservation strategies that rely on increased participation of civil society and Mexican citizens. The purpose of this paper was to identify resident attitudes towards sea turtle conservation and opportunities for enhanced community participation in Bahia Magdalena, a region in Baja California Sur, Mexico experiencing high levels of sea turtle poaching and bycatch in fisheries. Through semi-structured interviews we found that while residents were overwhelmingly interested in participating in sea turtle conservation, peer pressure and conflict within the community presented major challenges. The majority of residents indicated that sea turtle voluntourism would have a positive impact on their community. Economic incentives and increased protection for sea turtles were mentioned as benefits of sea turtle voluntourism, whereas peer pressure, difficulty obtaining permits and producing effective marketing materials, and doubt about direct economic benefits were cited as constraints. We discuss our results in terms of opportunities, challenges, and recommendations for improving community-focused sea turtle conservation throughout the region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-157
Number of pages10
JournalOcean and Coastal Management
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

community service
sea turtles
local participation
turtle
turtles
Mexico
bycatch
peers
sea
fishery
fisheries
poaching
economic incentives
civil society
meat
beaches
marketing
interviews
beach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

People helping turtles, turtles helping people : Understanding resident attitudes towards sea turtle conservation and opportunities for enhanced community participation in Bahia Magdalena, Mexico. / Senko, Jesse; Schneller, Andrew J.; Solis, Julio; Ollervides, Francisco; Nichols, Wallace J.

In: Ocean and Coastal Management, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 148-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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