“People first”: Factors that promote or inhibit community transformation

Mary Brown, Birgitta L. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Residents are key assets in community change. Despite this, little is known about residents’ perspectives regarding factors that facilitate or inhibit successful planning for neighborhood transformation. We conducted focus groups with residents of a low-wealth community involved with a neighborhood planning initiative and examined a planning document to elicit lived experience perspectives. Using Colaizzi’s approach to phenomenology, the following themes emerged: (1) trust; (2) resident-driven transformation; (3) sense of community and cohesion; (4) engagement and collective action; and (5) openness to transformation. Attending to the factors identified by neighborhood residents can inform community development planning and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCommunity Development
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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resident
community
collective action
planning
community development
cohesion
development planning
phenomenology
group cohesion
collective behavior
assets
experience
Group
document

Keywords

  • community development
  • community engagement
  • Community-based research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

“People first” : Factors that promote or inhibit community transformation. / Brown, Mary; Baker, Birgitta L.

In: Community Development, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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