Peers’ emotionality and children's academic achievement in second grade: Testing the moderating role of children's behavioral self-regulation

Maciel M. Hernández, Nancy Eisenberg, Carlos Valiente, Tracy L. Spinrad, Rebecca H. Berger, Sarah K. Johns, Anjolii Diaz, Diana E. Gal-Szabo, Marilyn S. Thompson, Jody Southworth, Armando A. Pina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although there is interest in the role of peers in children's schooling experiences, few researchers have examined associations and related underlying processes between peers’ emotionality, an aspect of temperament, and children's academic achievement. This study evaluated whether target children's (N = 260) own self-regulation, assessed with two behavioral measures, served a moderating function for associations between peers’ emotionality and children's own academic achievement in second grade. There was a positive association between peers’ positive emotionality and reading scores for children with higher self-regulation. Peers’ negative emotionality was negatively related to target children's reading scores, particularly for children with higher self-regulation levels, but was unrelated to math scores. Peers’ positive and negative emotionality did not predict math scores, and there was no strong evidence for the moderating role of target children's self-regulation in this association. This study highlights the potential role of children's self-regulation in modulating peer effects on academic achievement, particularly reading.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSocial Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • children's self-regulation
  • peers’ emotionality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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