Peer exclusion and victimization: Processes that mediate the relation between peer group rejection and children's classroom engagement and achievement?

Eric S. Buhs, Gary Ladd, Sarah L. Herald

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

449 Scopus citations

Abstract

Longitudinal data from a study of kindergarten through 5th graders were used to estimate a structural model in which chronic peer exclusion and chronic peer abuse were hypothesized to mediate the link between children's early peer rejection, later classroom engagement, and achievement. Peer exclusion and abuse were expected to predict changes in 2 forms of school engagement (classroom participation and school avoidance), and changes in both forms of engagement were expected to predict changes in achievement. The model fit the data well and lent support to the premise that distinct forms of peer maltreatment and classroom engagement mediate the link between early peer rejection and changes in children's achievement. Early peer rejection was associated with declining classroom participation and increasing school avoidance, but different forms of chronic peer maltreatment mediated these relations. Whereas chronic peer exclusion principally mediated the link between peer rejection and classroom participation, chronic peer abuse primarily mediated the link between rejection and school avoidance. Children's reduced classroom participation, more than gains in school avoidance, anteceded decrements in children's achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

Keywords

  • Classroom engagement
  • Exclusion
  • Peer relationships
  • Peer victimization
  • School adjustment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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