Pedagogical dramas and transformational play

Narratively rich games for learning

Sasha Barab, Tyler Dodge, Adam Ingram-Goble, Patrick Pettyjohn, Kylie Peppler, Charlene Volk, Maria Solomou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although every era is met with the introduction of powerful technologies for entertainment and learning, videogames represent a new contribution binding the two and bearing the potential to create sustained engagement in a curricular drama where the player's knowledgeable actions shape an unfolding fiction within a designed world. Although traditionally, stories involve an author, a performer, and an audience, much of the power of videogames as media for advancing narrative springs from their affordance for the player to occupy more than one role - and sometimes all three - simultaneously. In the narratively rich videogames that we design, players have the opportunity to perform actions, experience consequences, and reflect on the underlying social values that these situations were designed to engage, affording a type of narrative transactivity. Elsewhere we have discussed designing these media as contexts for engaging academic content; here we illuminate the power of videogames to engage children in ideological struggles as they are experienced in game-based adaptations of classic literature. Toward this end, we present our theoretical argument for the power of games as a contemporary story medium, grounding this discussion in the context of two game design projects and their implementations. Implications are discussed in terms of the potential of immersive, interactive media - videogame technology, in short - for achieving wide-ranging educational ends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-264
Number of pages30
JournalMind, Culture, and Activity
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drama
drama
Learning
learning
media technology
Technology
Social Values
narrative
entertainment
Power (Psychology)
Video Games
Values
experience
Players

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Education
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Barab, S., Dodge, T., Ingram-Goble, A., Pettyjohn, P., Peppler, K., Volk, C., & Solomou, M. (2010). Pedagogical dramas and transformational play: Narratively rich games for learning. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 17(3), 235-264. https://doi.org/10.1080/10749030903437228

Pedagogical dramas and transformational play : Narratively rich games for learning. / Barab, Sasha; Dodge, Tyler; Ingram-Goble, Adam; Pettyjohn, Patrick; Peppler, Kylie; Volk, Charlene; Solomou, Maria.

In: Mind, Culture, and Activity, Vol. 17, No. 3, 07.2010, p. 235-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barab, S, Dodge, T, Ingram-Goble, A, Pettyjohn, P, Peppler, K, Volk, C & Solomou, M 2010, 'Pedagogical dramas and transformational play: Narratively rich games for learning', Mind, Culture, and Activity, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 235-264. https://doi.org/10.1080/10749030903437228
Barab, Sasha ; Dodge, Tyler ; Ingram-Goble, Adam ; Pettyjohn, Patrick ; Peppler, Kylie ; Volk, Charlene ; Solomou, Maria. / Pedagogical dramas and transformational play : Narratively rich games for learning. In: Mind, Culture, and Activity. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 235-264.
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