Patterns of non-response to a mail survey

Caroline A. Macera, Kirby L. Jackson, Dorothy R. Davis, Jennie J. Kronenfeld, Steven N. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a basic investigation of possible non-response bias in a mail survey. We compare characteristics of responders and non-responders to a mail survey of health outcomes among participants of a longitudinal study of physical activity, physical fitness, and health. Results indicate that, at the first clinic visit, the responders were essentially the same as the non-responders on personal health history and laboratory measurements, while reporting significantly more family history of specific chronic diseases (cardiovascular disease, hypertension, stroke). The male responders were younger and reported more positive health behaviors as well as better weight and treadmill times at the first clinic visit. These results suggest that both response groups were equally healthy at entry, and that individuals who had family members with certain chronic conditions and who had positive health behaviors were more likely to respond (participate) in this health-related survey. Differences of this type could affect interpretation of future analyses. This work illustrates the importance of incorporating methods to examine non-response into any epidemiologic study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1427-1430
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume43
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
Postal Service
Ambulatory Care
Health Surveys
Physical Fitness
Health
Longitudinal Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Chronic Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Stroke
Hypertension
Weights and Measures
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Follow-up studies
  • Health-related studies
  • Longitudinal studies
  • Mail surveys
  • Non-response bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Macera, C. A., Jackson, K. L., Davis, D. R., Kronenfeld, J. J., & Blair, S. N. (1990). Patterns of non-response to a mail survey. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 43(12), 1427-1430. https://doi.org/10.1016/0895-4356(90)90112-3

Patterns of non-response to a mail survey. / Macera, Caroline A.; Jackson, Kirby L.; Davis, Dorothy R.; Kronenfeld, Jennie J.; Blair, Steven N.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 43, No. 12, 1990, p. 1427-1430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Macera, CA, Jackson, KL, Davis, DR, Kronenfeld, JJ & Blair, SN 1990, 'Patterns of non-response to a mail survey', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 43, no. 12, pp. 1427-1430. https://doi.org/10.1016/0895-4356(90)90112-3
Macera CA, Jackson KL, Davis DR, Kronenfeld JJ, Blair SN. Patterns of non-response to a mail survey. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 1990;43(12):1427-1430. https://doi.org/10.1016/0895-4356(90)90112-3
Macera, Caroline A. ; Jackson, Kirby L. ; Davis, Dorothy R. ; Kronenfeld, Jennie J. ; Blair, Steven N. / Patterns of non-response to a mail survey. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 1990 ; Vol. 43, No. 12. pp. 1427-1430.
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