Patterns of family negativity in the perinatal period: Implications for mental health among Mexican-origin women

Laura K. Winstone, Linda J. Luecken, Keith A. Crnic, Nancy A. Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Negativity in the family environment during the perinatal period is likely to have detrimental effects on maternal well-being, especially among low-income ethnic minority mothers who are at increased risk for experiencing postpartum depressive symptoms. With a sample of 322 Mexican and Mexican American families, this study used latent class growth analysis to identify meaningful subgroups of women based on their perceived family negativity reported prenatally and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 weeks postpartum. A 4-trajectory model of family negativity fit the data well: low-stable (58%), moderate-increasing (26%), high-decreasing (8%), and high-increasing (8%). Higher prenatal depressive symptomatology predicted membership in the moderate-increasing, high-decreasing, and high-increasing trajectories, relative to the low-stable trajectory. Findings suggest substantial heterogeneity in family negativity, identifying three significant growth patterns during the perinatal period with differential implications for maternal depressive symptomatology at 24 weeks and 12 months after delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-651
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Family negativity
  • Latent class growth analysis
  • Mexican
  • Mexican American
  • Postpartum depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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