Patterns of entry, professional identity, and attitudes toward crime-related education: A study of criminal justice and criminology faculty

Jack R. Greene, Timothy S. Bynum, Vincent J. Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the field of crime-related education, examination of the characteristics of teaching, research, and institutional differences has recently been a concern. This study examines full-time faculty (N=929) and their patterns of entry, including academic degree held, academic major, past academic and agency experience, and type of institution; and the extent to which differing methods of access are associated with attitudes toward research, scholarship, agency practice, academic collegiality, and orientation toward crime-related study. Dual paradigms seem to exist in crime-related education: one centering on teaching, field practice, and professionalism; the other on research, scholarship, and the more traditional values of academe.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-59
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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