Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody

R. F. Sommese, Rizal Hariadi, K. Kim, M. Liu, M. J. Tyska, S. Sivaramakrishnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DNA nanostructures have become an important and powerful tool for studying protein function over the last 5 years. One of the challenges, though, has been the development of universal methods for patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures. Herein, we present a new approach for labeling DNA nanostructures by functionalizing them with a GFP nanobody. We demonstrate the ability to precisely control protein attachment via our nanobody linker using two enzymatic model systems, namely adenylyl cyclase activity and myosin motility. Finally, we test the power of this attachment method by patterning unpurified, endogenously expressed Arp2/3 protein complex from cell lysate. By bridging DNA nanostructures with a fluorescent protein ubiquitous throughout cell and developmental biology and protein biochemistry, this approach significantly streamlines the application of DNA nanostructures as a programmable scaffold in biological studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2089-2094
Number of pages6
JournalProtein Science
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Single-Domain Antibodies
Nanostructures
DNA
Proteins
Actin-Related Protein 2-3 Complex
Cytology
Developmental Biology
Biochemistry
Myosins
Adenylyl Cyclases
Scaffolds
Labeling
Cell Biology

Keywords

  • adenylyl cyclase
  • Arp2/3
  • DNA nanostructures
  • GFP
  • myosin VI
  • nanobody

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Sommese, R. F., Hariadi, R., Kim, K., Liu, M., Tyska, M. J., & Sivaramakrishnan, S. (2016). Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody. Protein Science, 25(11), 2089-2094. https://doi.org/10.1002/pro.3020

Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody. / Sommese, R. F.; Hariadi, Rizal; Kim, K.; Liu, M.; Tyska, M. J.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

In: Protein Science, Vol. 25, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 2089-2094.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sommese, RF, Hariadi, R, Kim, K, Liu, M, Tyska, MJ & Sivaramakrishnan, S 2016, 'Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody', Protein Science, vol. 25, no. 11, pp. 2089-2094. https://doi.org/10.1002/pro.3020
Sommese RF, Hariadi R, Kim K, Liu M, Tyska MJ, Sivaramakrishnan S. Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody. Protein Science. 2016 Nov 1;25(11):2089-2094. https://doi.org/10.1002/pro.3020
Sommese, R. F. ; Hariadi, Rizal ; Kim, K. ; Liu, M. ; Tyska, M. J. ; Sivaramakrishnan, S. / Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody. In: Protein Science. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 11. pp. 2089-2094.
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