Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation

James R. Rodrigue, Danielle L. Cornell, Bruce Kaplan, Richard J. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ. Objective - To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Methods - One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health. Results - Slightly more than half the patients (56.1%) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6). Conclusion - White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-31
Number of pages7
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kidney Transplantation
Kidney
Living Donors
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Education
Tissue Donors
Health
Health Status
Chronic Kidney Failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Rodrigue, J. R., Cornell, D. L., Kaplan, B., & Howard, R. J. (2008). Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Progress in Transplantation, 18(1), 25-31.

Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. / Rodrigue, James R.; Cornell, Danielle L.; Kaplan, Bruce; Howard, Richard J.

In: Progress in Transplantation, Vol. 18, No. 1, 03.2008, p. 25-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodrigue, JR, Cornell, DL, Kaplan, B & Howard, RJ 2008, 'Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation', Progress in Transplantation, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 25-31.
Rodrigue JR, Cornell DL, Kaplan B, Howard RJ. Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Progress in Transplantation. 2008 Mar;18(1):25-31.
Rodrigue, James R. ; Cornell, Danielle L. ; Kaplan, Bruce ; Howard, Richard J. / Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. In: Progress in Transplantation. 2008 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 25-31.
@article{795227f65213493eacb1ac30ad29ed2a,
title = "Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation",
abstract = "Background - Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ. Objective - To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Methods - One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health. Results - Slightly more than half the patients (56.1{\%}) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6). Conclusion - White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation.",
author = "Rodrigue, {James R.} and Cornell, {Danielle L.} and Bruce Kaplan and Howard, {Richard J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "25--31",
journal = "Progress in Transplantation",
issn = "1526-9248",
publisher = "InnoVision Communications",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation

AU - Rodrigue, James R.

AU - Cornell, Danielle L.

AU - Kaplan, Bruce

AU - Howard, Richard J.

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - Background - Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ. Objective - To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Methods - One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health. Results - Slightly more than half the patients (56.1%) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6). Conclusion - White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation.

AB - Background - Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ. Objective - To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Methods - One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health. Results - Slightly more than half the patients (56.1%) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6). Conclusion - White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=40949099066&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=40949099066&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 18429579

AN - SCOPUS:40949099066

VL - 18

SP - 25

EP - 31

JO - Progress in Transplantation

JF - Progress in Transplantation

SN - 1526-9248

IS - 1

ER -