Patient streaming as a mechanism for improving responsiveness in emergency departments

Soroush Saghafian, Wallace J. Hopp, Mark P. Van Oyen, Jeffrey S. Desmond, Steven L. Kronick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Crisis-level overcrowding conditions in emergency departments (EDs) have led hospitals to seek out new patient-flow designs to improve both responsiveness and safety. One approach that has attracted attention and experimentation in the emergency medicine community is a system in which ED beds and care teams are segregated and patients are "streamed" based on predictions of whether they will be discharged or admitted to the hospital. In this paper, we use a combination of analytic and simulation models to determine whether such a streaming policy can improve ED performance, where it is most likely to be effective, and how it should be implemented for maximum performance. Our results suggest that the concept of streaming can indeed improve patient flow, but only in some situations. First, ED resources must be shared across streams rather than physically separated. This leads us to propose a new "virtual-streaming" patient flow design for EDs. Second, this type of streaming is most effective in EDs with (1) a high percentage of admitted patients, (2) longer care times for admitted patients than discharged patients, (3) a high day-to-day variation in the percentage of admitted patients, (4) long patient boarding times (e.g., caused by hospital "bed-block"), and (5) high average physician utilization. Finally, to take full advantage of streaming, physicians assigned to admit patients should prioritize upstream (new) patients, whereas physicians assigned to discharge patients should prioritize downstream (old) patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1080-1097
Number of pages18
JournalOperations Research
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Hospital beds
Medicine
Responsiveness
Emergency department

Keywords

  • Emergency department
  • Healthcare operations management
  • Patient flow
  • Patient sequencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

Saghafian, S., Hopp, W. J., Van Oyen, M. P., Desmond, J. S., & Kronick, S. L. (2012). Patient streaming as a mechanism for improving responsiveness in emergency departments. Operations Research, 60(5), 1080-1097. https://doi.org/10.1287/opre.1120.1096

Patient streaming as a mechanism for improving responsiveness in emergency departments. / Saghafian, Soroush; Hopp, Wallace J.; Van Oyen, Mark P.; Desmond, Jeffrey S.; Kronick, Steven L.

In: Operations Research, Vol. 60, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 1080-1097.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saghafian, S, Hopp, WJ, Van Oyen, MP, Desmond, JS & Kronick, SL 2012, 'Patient streaming as a mechanism for improving responsiveness in emergency departments', Operations Research, vol. 60, no. 5, pp. 1080-1097. https://doi.org/10.1287/opre.1120.1096
Saghafian, Soroush ; Hopp, Wallace J. ; Van Oyen, Mark P. ; Desmond, Jeffrey S. ; Kronick, Steven L. / Patient streaming as a mechanism for improving responsiveness in emergency departments. In: Operations Research. 2012 ; Vol. 60, No. 5. pp. 1080-1097.
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