Pathways to teacher learning in multicultural contexts: A longitudinal case study of two novice bilingual teachers in urban schools

Alfredo J. Artiles, Ramona M. Barreto, Luis Peña, Karen McClafferty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

This longitudinal case study focused on the learning trajectories of two novice bilingual education teachers in urban schools. We traced changes in and relationships between these teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and interactive thinking about teaching culturally diverse learners. Multiple data collection strategies were used, including concept maps, in-depth interviews, surveys, and stimulated recall interviews. Data were collected before and after a multicultural education course in which the teachers were enrolled during their 1-year MEd and credential program. Data were also collected during their first and second years of inservice teaching. Results suggest that the relationship between teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and decision making is complicated and dynamic. Classroom and school contexts affected teachers' attempts to enact constructivist and social justice education principles. Moreover, prior beliefs as well as the teacher education program (TEP) and teachers' own developmental needs contributed to the ways in which these teachers learned to teach. The findings suggest that if we are to prepare teachers to teach culturally diverse learners, we must design TEPs that provide both resources and opportunities to master and appropriate the components of good teaching for diverse learners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-89
Number of pages20
JournalRemedial and Special Education
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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