Pathways Linking Childhood SES and Adult Health Behaviors and Psychological Resources in Black and White Men

Jennifer Morozink Boylan, Jenny M. Cundiff, Karen P. Jakubowski, Dustin Pardini, Karen A. Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Exposure to low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood predicts increased morbidity and mortality. However, little prospective evidence is available to test pathways linking low childhood SES to adult health. Purpose: In the current study, indirect effects through positive parenting in adolescence and adult SES were tested in the association between childhood SES and adult health behaviors and psychological resources. Methods: Men (n = 305; 53% Black) were followed longitudinally from ages 7 to 32. SES was measured annually in childhood (ages 7-9) and again in adulthood (age 32) using the Hollingshead index. Parenting was assessed annually (ages 13-16) using caregivers' and boys' self-report of supervision, communication, and expectations for their son's future. Health behaviors (cigarette and alcohol use, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity) and psychological resources (optimism, purpose in life, self-mastery, and self-esteem) were assessed in adulthood (age 32). Results: Structural equation modeling showed that higher childhood SES was associated with more positive parenting in adolescence and higher adult SES. Higher childhood SES was indirectly associated with healthier behaviors and higher psychological resources in adulthood through pathways involving positive parenting during adolescence and SES in adulthood. Findings were consistent in both racial groups. Conclusions: Positive parenting in adolescence was an important pathway in understanding associations among childhood SES and health behaviors and psychological resources in adulthood. Low childhood SES was prospectively associated with healthier behaviors and greater psychological resources in part through more positive parenting in adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1023-1035
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Volume52
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 12 2018

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
Social Class
Psychology
Parenting
hydroquinone
Nuclear Family
Self Concept
Tobacco Products
Vegetables
Self Report
Caregivers
Fruit
Communication
Alcohols
Exercise
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Pathways Linking Childhood SES and Adult Health Behaviors and Psychological Resources in Black and White Men. / Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Cundiff, Jenny M.; Jakubowski, Karen P.; Pardini, Dustin; Matthews, Karen A.

In: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 52, No. 12, 12.11.2018, p. 1023-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4b5b9c3c21724252a2cd161d30490567,
title = "Pathways Linking Childhood SES and Adult Health Behaviors and Psychological Resources in Black and White Men",
abstract = "Background: Exposure to low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood predicts increased morbidity and mortality. However, little prospective evidence is available to test pathways linking low childhood SES to adult health. Purpose: In the current study, indirect effects through positive parenting in adolescence and adult SES were tested in the association between childhood SES and adult health behaviors and psychological resources. Methods: Men (n = 305; 53{\%} Black) were followed longitudinally from ages 7 to 32. SES was measured annually in childhood (ages 7-9) and again in adulthood (age 32) using the Hollingshead index. Parenting was assessed annually (ages 13-16) using caregivers' and boys' self-report of supervision, communication, and expectations for their son's future. Health behaviors (cigarette and alcohol use, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity) and psychological resources (optimism, purpose in life, self-mastery, and self-esteem) were assessed in adulthood (age 32). Results: Structural equation modeling showed that higher childhood SES was associated with more positive parenting in adolescence and higher adult SES. Higher childhood SES was indirectly associated with healthier behaviors and higher psychological resources in adulthood through pathways involving positive parenting during adolescence and SES in adulthood. Findings were consistent in both racial groups. Conclusions: Positive parenting in adolescence was an important pathway in understanding associations among childhood SES and health behaviors and psychological resources in adulthood. Low childhood SES was prospectively associated with healthier behaviors and greater psychological resources in part through more positive parenting in adolescence.",
author = "Boylan, {Jennifer Morozink} and Cundiff, {Jenny M.} and Jakubowski, {Karen P.} and Dustin Pardini and Matthews, {Karen A.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1093/abm/kay006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "1023--1035",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pathways Linking Childhood SES and Adult Health Behaviors and Psychological Resources in Black and White Men

AU - Boylan, Jennifer Morozink

AU - Cundiff, Jenny M.

AU - Jakubowski, Karen P.

AU - Pardini, Dustin

AU - Matthews, Karen A.

PY - 2018/11/12

Y1 - 2018/11/12

N2 - Background: Exposure to low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood predicts increased morbidity and mortality. However, little prospective evidence is available to test pathways linking low childhood SES to adult health. Purpose: In the current study, indirect effects through positive parenting in adolescence and adult SES were tested in the association between childhood SES and adult health behaviors and psychological resources. Methods: Men (n = 305; 53% Black) were followed longitudinally from ages 7 to 32. SES was measured annually in childhood (ages 7-9) and again in adulthood (age 32) using the Hollingshead index. Parenting was assessed annually (ages 13-16) using caregivers' and boys' self-report of supervision, communication, and expectations for their son's future. Health behaviors (cigarette and alcohol use, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity) and psychological resources (optimism, purpose in life, self-mastery, and self-esteem) were assessed in adulthood (age 32). Results: Structural equation modeling showed that higher childhood SES was associated with more positive parenting in adolescence and higher adult SES. Higher childhood SES was indirectly associated with healthier behaviors and higher psychological resources in adulthood through pathways involving positive parenting during adolescence and SES in adulthood. Findings were consistent in both racial groups. Conclusions: Positive parenting in adolescence was an important pathway in understanding associations among childhood SES and health behaviors and psychological resources in adulthood. Low childhood SES was prospectively associated with healthier behaviors and greater psychological resources in part through more positive parenting in adolescence.

AB - Background: Exposure to low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood predicts increased morbidity and mortality. However, little prospective evidence is available to test pathways linking low childhood SES to adult health. Purpose: In the current study, indirect effects through positive parenting in adolescence and adult SES were tested in the association between childhood SES and adult health behaviors and psychological resources. Methods: Men (n = 305; 53% Black) were followed longitudinally from ages 7 to 32. SES was measured annually in childhood (ages 7-9) and again in adulthood (age 32) using the Hollingshead index. Parenting was assessed annually (ages 13-16) using caregivers' and boys' self-report of supervision, communication, and expectations for their son's future. Health behaviors (cigarette and alcohol use, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity) and psychological resources (optimism, purpose in life, self-mastery, and self-esteem) were assessed in adulthood (age 32). Results: Structural equation modeling showed that higher childhood SES was associated with more positive parenting in adolescence and higher adult SES. Higher childhood SES was indirectly associated with healthier behaviors and higher psychological resources in adulthood through pathways involving positive parenting during adolescence and SES in adulthood. Findings were consistent in both racial groups. Conclusions: Positive parenting in adolescence was an important pathway in understanding associations among childhood SES and health behaviors and psychological resources in adulthood. Low childhood SES was prospectively associated with healthier behaviors and greater psychological resources in part through more positive parenting in adolescence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051095553&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85051095553&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/abm/kay006

DO - 10.1093/abm/kay006

M3 - Article

C2 - 29546291

AN - SCOPUS:85051095553

VL - 52

SP - 1023

EP - 1035

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - 12

ER -