Pathways for African American Success: Results of Three-Arm Randomized Trial to Test the Effects of Technology-Based Delivery for Rural African American Families

Velma Mc Bride Murry, Cady Berkel, Misha N. Inniss-Thompson, Marlena L. Debreaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a technology-based program to avert risky behaviors among rural African American youth. We hypothesized that the technology-based and group-based formats of the Pathways for African Americans Success (PAAS) program would lead to improvements in primary outcomes, and that the technology condition would perform at least as well as the group condition. METHODS: A three-arm Randomized Control Trial (RCT) ([N = 141] technology-based delivery, [N = 141] small group delivery, and [N = 136] literature control) was conducted with 421 sixth graders and their caregivers, Summer 2009-Fall 2012. Families were recruited from five rural counties in Tennessee and completed baseline, posttest [M = 14.5 (4.4) months after pretest] and long-term follow-up [M = 22.6 (3.7) months after posttest]. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test intervention-induced changes in both parents and youths' primary outcomes (pretest to posttest) and on secondary targeted outcome, youth sexual risk, and substance use patterns (pretest to follow-up). RESULTS: Parents in the technology condition reported significant increases in strategies to reduce risk. Youth in the technology condition experienced a significant decline in intent to engage in risk behaviors and reduction in substance use and sexual risk behavior. Youth in the group condition experienced a significant increase in affiliation with deviant peers. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of the ability of eHealth to improve parenting and reduce adolescent engagement in substance use and sexual risk behavior. Suggestions for dissemination in schools and health-care systems are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-387
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

African Americans
Technology
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Parents
Aptitude
School Health Services
Telemedicine
Parenting
Risk Reduction Behavior
Caregivers
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • computer applications/eHealth
  • evidence-based practice
  • parenting
  • race/ethnicity
  • risk behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Pathways for African American Success : Results of Three-Arm Randomized Trial to Test the Effects of Technology-Based Delivery for Rural African American Families. / Murry, Velma Mc Bride; Berkel, Cady; Inniss-Thompson, Misha N.; Debreaux, Marlena L.

In: Journal of pediatric psychology, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.04.2019, p. 375-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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