Participant Satisfaction With a Culturally Appropriate Diabetes Education Program: The Native American Diabetes Project

Julie A. Griffin, Susan S. Gilliland, Georgia Perez, Deborah Helitzer, Janette S. Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE the purpose of this paper is to report on participant satisfaction with the Native American Diabetes Project diabetes education program. METHODS A questionnaire was designed to measure satisfaction among participants in the diabetes education program, which consisted of five sessions designed according to the Transtheoretical Model of Change and Social Action Theory with input from community members. Eight pueblo communities participated in the program. Sessions were taught by community mentors in three sites in New Mexico. One site taught sessions in a one-on-one format, and two sites taught sessions in a group format. RESULTS The results showed that participant satisfaction did not vary based on session delivery type or by session site. Overall, participants responded positively to sessions designed according to Social Action Theory and with cultural competency. Retention rates for the sessions were 81% for group sessions and 91% for one-on-one sessions. CONCLUSIONS Using a strong theoretical framework and community input to design diabetes education sessions may be important factors in participant satisfaction and retention in diabetes lifestyle education sessions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-363
Number of pages13
JournalThe Diabetes Educator
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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North American Indians
Education
Cultural Competency
Mentors
Life Style
Social Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Participant Satisfaction With a Culturally Appropriate Diabetes Education Program : The Native American Diabetes Project. / Griffin, Julie A.; Gilliland, Susan S.; Perez, Georgia; Helitzer, Deborah; Carter, Janette S.

In: The Diabetes Educator, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 351-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Griffin, Julie A. ; Gilliland, Susan S. ; Perez, Georgia ; Helitzer, Deborah ; Carter, Janette S. / Participant Satisfaction With a Culturally Appropriate Diabetes Education Program : The Native American Diabetes Project. In: The Diabetes Educator. 1999 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 351-363.
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