Paper use with the electronic medical record: An important supplement or negative circumvention?

Jason J. Saleem, Alissa L. Russ, Connie F. Justice, Heather Hagg, Peter A. Woodbridge, Bradley N. Doebbeling

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Healthcare organizations are increasingly implementing electronic medical records (EMRs) and other related health information technology (IT). Even in institutions which have long adopted these computerized systems, there are still instances where employees rely on paper to complete their work. The use of paper suggests that parts of the EMR may not be sufficiently designed to support clinicians and their work processes. To understand the use of paper-based alternatives, we conducted 14 key-informant interviews in a large Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), with a fully implemented EMR. We found nine distinct categories of paper-based workarounds to the use of the EMR. In several cases, paper served as an important tool and assisted healthcare employees in their work. In other cases, paper use circumvented the intended EMR design, introduced potential gaps in documentation, and generated possible paths to medical error. We discuss implications of these findings for EMR design and implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
Pages773-777
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period9/22/089/26/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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