Oxidant or Catalyst for Oxidation? A Study of How Structure and Disorder Change the Selectivity for Direct versus Catalytic Oxidation Mediated by Manganese(III,IV) Oxides

Mayada Sabri, Hannah J. King, Rosalind J. Gummow, Xunyu Lu, Chuan Zhao, Michael Oelgemöller, Lan-Yun Chang, Rosalie K. Hocking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Structure type and disorder have become important questions in catalyst design, with the most active catalysts often noted to be "disordered" or "amorphous" in nature. To quantify the effects of disorder and structure type systematically, a test set of manganese(III,IV) oxides was developed and their reactivity as oxidants and catalysts tested against three substrates: methylene blue, hydrogen peroxide, and water. We find that disorder destabilizes the materials thermodynamically, making them stronger chemical oxidants but not necessarily better catalysts. For the disproportionation of H2O2 and the oxidative decomposition of methylene blue, MnOx-mediated direct oxidation competes with catalytically mediated oxidation, making the most disordered materials the worst catalysts, whereas for water oxidation, the most disordered materials and the strongest chemical oxidants are also the best catalysts. Even though the manganese(III,IV) oxide materials were able to oxidize both methylene blue and peroxides directly, the same materials were able to act as catalysts for the oxidation of methylene blue in the presence of peroxides. This implies that effects of electron transfer time scales are important and strongly affected by structure type and disorder. This is discussed in the context of catalyst design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8244-8256
Number of pages13
JournalChemistry of Materials
Volume30
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 27 2018

Fingerprint

Catalytic oxidation
Manganese
Oxidants
Oxides
Oxidation
Catalysts
Methylene Blue
Peroxides
Water
Hydrogen peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide
Decomposition
Electrons
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Oxidant or Catalyst for Oxidation? A Study of How Structure and Disorder Change the Selectivity for Direct versus Catalytic Oxidation Mediated by Manganese(III,IV) Oxides. / Sabri, Mayada; King, Hannah J.; Gummow, Rosalind J.; Lu, Xunyu; Zhao, Chuan; Oelgemöller, Michael; Chang, Lan-Yun; Hocking, Rosalie K.

In: Chemistry of Materials, Vol. 30, No. 22, 27.11.2018, p. 8244-8256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sabri, Mayada ; King, Hannah J. ; Gummow, Rosalind J. ; Lu, Xunyu ; Zhao, Chuan ; Oelgemöller, Michael ; Chang, Lan-Yun ; Hocking, Rosalie K. / Oxidant or Catalyst for Oxidation? A Study of How Structure and Disorder Change the Selectivity for Direct versus Catalytic Oxidation Mediated by Manganese(III,IV) Oxides. In: Chemistry of Materials. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 22. pp. 8244-8256.
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