Overcoming Common Misunderstandings About Students With Disabilities Who Are English Language Learners

Gregory A. Cheatham, Juliet Barnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Special education programs are increasingly serving students with disabilities who are English language learners and their families. Facilitating bilingualism is an effective practice and aligns with culturally responsive special education service provision. It is critical for special educators and service providers to learn about bilingualism, second language learning, and students with disabilities to responsibly participate in individualized education program team decision making. This column presents five misunderstandings about students who are English language learners with disabilities. Based on the research literature, responses to each misunderstanding are presented and include implications and recommendations for special educators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-63
Number of pages6
JournalIntervention in School and Clinic
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Multilingualism
English language
Special Education
Language
disability
multilingualism
Students
special education
educator
student
service provider
Decision Making
Learning
Education
decision making
language
Research
learning
education

Keywords

  • bilingualism
  • disabilities
  • English language learners
  • families

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Overcoming Common Misunderstandings About Students With Disabilities Who Are English Language Learners. / Cheatham, Gregory A.; Barnett, Juliet.

In: Intervention in School and Clinic, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.09.2017, p. 58-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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