Outcome of patients with injection drug use-associated endocarditis admitted to an intensive care unit

Ghulam Saydain, Jatinder Singh, Bhavinkumar Dalal, Wonsuk Yoo, Donald P. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to study the outcome of patients with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis (IDU-IE) admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Material and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of 33 consecutive patients with IDU-IE admitted to ICU was conducted. Results: Main indications for admission to ICU were as follows: severe sepsis or septic shock (36%), respiratory failure (33%), and neurologic deterioration (18%). Staphylococcus aureus was found in 94% of patients, and 15% had polymicrobial infection. Fifteen (45%) patients had septic emboli to 1 or more organs, including 12 (36%) to lungs and 7 (21%) to central nervous system. In-hospital mortality was 27%, and in univariate analysis, previous history of endocarditis (odds ratio [OR], 11.2; P = .03), respiratory failure (OR, 7; P = .03), neurologic failure (OR, 6.25; P = .03), and high Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (OR, 1.21; P = .016) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (OR, 1.25; P = .01) increased risk of death. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, previous history of endocarditis and high Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score were independently associated with poor survival. Conclusions: Complicated IDU-IE necessitating admission to ICU is associated with high mortality. In addition to consequences of sepsis, septic embolization to central nervous system and lungs contributes to development of organ failure. Increased severity of illness and prior history of endocarditis are associated with poor outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-253
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Endocarditis
  • Injection drug use
  • Intensive care
  • Septic emboli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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