Origin, paleoecology, and extirpation of bluebirds and crossbills in the Bahamas across the last glacial–interglacial transition

David W. Steadman, Janet Franklin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On low islands or island groups such as the Bahamas, surrounded by shallow oceans, Quaternary glacial–interglacial changes in climate and sea level had major effects on terrestrial plant and animal communities. We examine the paleoecology of two species of songbirds (Passeriformes) recorded as Late Pleistocene fossils on the Bahamian island of Abaco—the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) and Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia megaplaga). Each species lives today only outside of the Bahamian Archipelago, with S. sialis occurring in North and Central America and L. megaplaga endemic to Hispaniola. Unrecorded in the Holocene fossil record of Abaco, both of these species probably colonized Abaco during the last glacial interval but were eliminated when the island became much smaller, warmer, wetter, and more isolated during the last glacial–interglacial transition from ∼15 to 9 ka. Today’s warming temperatures and rising sea levels, although not as great in magnitude as those that took place from ∼15 to 9 ka, are occurring rapidly and may contribute to considerable biotic change on islands by acting in synergy with direct human impacts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9924-9929
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume114
Issue number37
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 12 2017

Fingerprint

Bahamas
Islands
Oceans and Seas
Fossils
Passeriformes
Central America
Songbirds
Climate Change
North America
Temperature

Keywords

  • Bahamas
  • Bluebird
  • Crossbill
  • Extirpation
  • Island biogeography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Origin, paleoecology, and extirpation of bluebirds and crossbills in the Bahamas across the last glacial–interglacial transition. / Steadman, David W.; Franklin, Janet.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 114, No. 37, 12.09.2017, p. 9924-9929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e2715fbd1c3b46968ec5b14e5b315af2,
title = "Origin, paleoecology, and extirpation of bluebirds and crossbills in the Bahamas across the last glacial–interglacial transition",
abstract = "On low islands or island groups such as the Bahamas, surrounded by shallow oceans, Quaternary glacial–interglacial changes in climate and sea level had major effects on terrestrial plant and animal communities. We examine the paleoecology of two species of songbirds (Passeriformes) recorded as Late Pleistocene fossils on the Bahamian island of Abaco—the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) and Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia megaplaga). Each species lives today only outside of the Bahamian Archipelago, with S. sialis occurring in North and Central America and L. megaplaga endemic to Hispaniola. Unrecorded in the Holocene fossil record of Abaco, both of these species probably colonized Abaco during the last glacial interval but were eliminated when the island became much smaller, warmer, wetter, and more isolated during the last glacial–interglacial transition from ∼15 to 9 ka. Today’s warming temperatures and rising sea levels, although not as great in magnitude as those that took place from ∼15 to 9 ka, are occurring rapidly and may contribute to considerable biotic change on islands by acting in synergy with direct human impacts.",
keywords = "Bahamas, Bluebird, Crossbill, Extirpation, Island biogeography",
author = "Steadman, {David W.} and Janet Franklin",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.1707660114",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "114",
pages = "9924--9929",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
number = "37",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Origin, paleoecology, and extirpation of bluebirds and crossbills in the Bahamas across the last glacial–interglacial transition

AU - Steadman, David W.

AU - Franklin, Janet

PY - 2017/9/12

Y1 - 2017/9/12

N2 - On low islands or island groups such as the Bahamas, surrounded by shallow oceans, Quaternary glacial–interglacial changes in climate and sea level had major effects on terrestrial plant and animal communities. We examine the paleoecology of two species of songbirds (Passeriformes) recorded as Late Pleistocene fossils on the Bahamian island of Abaco—the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) and Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia megaplaga). Each species lives today only outside of the Bahamian Archipelago, with S. sialis occurring in North and Central America and L. megaplaga endemic to Hispaniola. Unrecorded in the Holocene fossil record of Abaco, both of these species probably colonized Abaco during the last glacial interval but were eliminated when the island became much smaller, warmer, wetter, and more isolated during the last glacial–interglacial transition from ∼15 to 9 ka. Today’s warming temperatures and rising sea levels, although not as great in magnitude as those that took place from ∼15 to 9 ka, are occurring rapidly and may contribute to considerable biotic change on islands by acting in synergy with direct human impacts.

AB - On low islands or island groups such as the Bahamas, surrounded by shallow oceans, Quaternary glacial–interglacial changes in climate and sea level had major effects on terrestrial plant and animal communities. We examine the paleoecology of two species of songbirds (Passeriformes) recorded as Late Pleistocene fossils on the Bahamian island of Abaco—the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) and Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia megaplaga). Each species lives today only outside of the Bahamian Archipelago, with S. sialis occurring in North and Central America and L. megaplaga endemic to Hispaniola. Unrecorded in the Holocene fossil record of Abaco, both of these species probably colonized Abaco during the last glacial interval but were eliminated when the island became much smaller, warmer, wetter, and more isolated during the last glacial–interglacial transition from ∼15 to 9 ka. Today’s warming temperatures and rising sea levels, although not as great in magnitude as those that took place from ∼15 to 9 ka, are occurring rapidly and may contribute to considerable biotic change on islands by acting in synergy with direct human impacts.

KW - Bahamas

KW - Bluebird

KW - Crossbill

KW - Extirpation

KW - Island biogeography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029436320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029436320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1707660114

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1707660114

M3 - Article

VL - 114

SP - 9924

EP - 9929

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 37

ER -