Organotypic 3D cell culture models: Using the rotating wall vessel to study hostĝ€"pathogen interactions

Jennifer Barrila, Andrea L. Radtke, Auŕlie Crabbé, Shameema F. Sarker, Melissa M. Herbst-Kralovetz, C. Mark Ott, Cheryl Nickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

146 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Appropriately simulating the three-dimensional (3D) environment in which tissues normally develop and function is crucial for engineering in vitro models that can be used for the meaningful dissection of hostĝ€" pathogen interactions. This Review highlights how the rotating wall vessel bioreactor has been used to establish 3D hierarchical models that range in complexity from a single cell type to multicellular co-culture models that recapitulate the 3D architecture of tissues observed in vivo. The application of these models to the study of infectious diseases is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)791-801
Number of pages11
JournalNature Reviews Microbiology
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

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Host-Pathogen Interactions
Cell Culture Techniques
Bioreactors
Coculture Techniques
Communicable Diseases
Dissection
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Organotypic 3D cell culture models : Using the rotating wall vessel to study hostĝ€"pathogen interactions. / Barrila, Jennifer; Radtke, Andrea L.; Crabbé, Auŕlie; Sarker, Shameema F.; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M.; Ott, C. Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl.

In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, Vol. 8, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 791-801.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barrila, Jennifer ; Radtke, Andrea L. ; Crabbé, Auŕlie ; Sarker, Shameema F. ; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M. ; Ott, C. Mark ; Nickerson, Cheryl. / Organotypic 3D cell culture models : Using the rotating wall vessel to study hostĝ€"pathogen interactions. In: Nature Reviews Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 8, No. 11. pp. 791-801.
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