Organizational climate systems and psychological climate perceptions: A cross-level study of climate-satisfaction relationships

Mathis Schulte, Cheri Ostroff, Angelo J. Kinicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research has consistently demonstrated that both individual-level climate perceptions and organizational climate are related to job satisfaction; however, little work has investigated their relative importance in a single study. Using a sample of 1,076 employees from 120 branches of a US-based bank, the relative importance of individual-and unit-level climate on individual satisfaction was examined. Cross-level results of hierarchical linear models indicated that individuals' perceptions of the climate accounted for a large percentage of variance in individuals' satisfaction. Further, unit-level climate systems accounted for a small but significant portion of individual satisfaction above and beyond individuals' perceptions of the climate. These results suggest that the overall climate in a work unit has some influence on individual attitudes, after accounting for individuals' idiosyncratic perceptions of the climate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-671
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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