Organizational characteristics and funding environments: A study of a population of United Way-affiliated nonprofits

Melissa Middleton Stone, Mark Hager, Jennifer J. Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines a population of United Way-affiliated nonprofit organizations in Massachusetts (1) to test hypotheses generated by previous research on relationships between government funding and specific nonprofit organizational characteristics, (2) to compare differences in organizational characteristics between nonprofits receiving higher percentages of revenues from the United Way and from government sources, and (3) to explore associations between government funding and United Way and underexamined characteristics, including use of commercial income and racial diversity of organizational membership. The study supports previous research on the relationship between government funding and nonprofit characteristics, with one notable exception - less administrative complexity was associated with higher percentages of government funding. The study also finds differences in organizational characteristics between nonprofits with higher proportions of government funding and those with higher percentages of United Way funding, including organization size, number of board members, administrative complexity, use of volunteers, and the racial diversity of boards, staff, and volunteers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-289
Number of pages14
JournalPublic Administration Review
Volume61
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2001
Externally publishedYes

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funding
non-profit-organization
Funding
Government funding
Organizational characteristics
revenue
staff
income
organization
Volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Organizational characteristics and funding environments : A study of a population of United Way-affiliated nonprofits. / Stone, Melissa Middleton; Hager, Mark; Griffin, Jennifer J.

In: Public Administration Review, Vol. 61, No. 3, 05.2001, p. 276-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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