Organisation of ambulatory care by consumers

J. J. Kronenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There has been a great deal of research in medical sociology and health services research dealing with health behaviour, especially as it relates to ambulatory medical care services. This paper exmines how people structure their own health care with the presumably 'free market' system of choice such as operates in the United States. It provides an introductory picture of how people organise services and the variety of sources to which they go to fullfil their medical needs. Berkanovic and Reeder have pointed out that one can study use of medical services through examining the sources from which care is received or the volume. Much past research has focused on volume of care, emphasizing amount of utilization and number of physician visits or outpatients visits. The aim of this paper is to analyse sources of care and patterns of ambulatory medical care, not utilisation statistics. An important question is whether there are limitations of choice imposed by differential distribution of social characteristics such as knowledge, income or age. This paper first describes patterns of care-seeking and the relates them to social, demographic and illness variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-200
Number of pages18
JournalSociology of Health and Illness
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ambulatory Care
Medical Sociology
Organizations
Health Services Research
Health Behavior
Research
medical care
Outpatients
utilization
Demography
medical sociology
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
medical services
health behavior
health service
illness
statistics
physician
health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Organisation of ambulatory care by consumers. / Kronenfeld, J. J.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1982, p. 183-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kronenfeld, JJ 1982, 'Organisation of ambulatory care by consumers', Sociology of Health and Illness, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 183-200.
Kronenfeld, J. J. / Organisation of ambulatory care by consumers. In: Sociology of Health and Illness. 1982 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 183-200.
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