Organ donation after circulatory death: The forgotten donor?

Mohamed Y. Rady, Joseph L. Verheijde, Joan McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Donation after circulatory death (DCD) can be performed on neurologically intact donors who do not fulfill neurologic or brain death criteria before circulatory arrest. This commentary focuses on the most controversial donor-related issues anticipated from mandatory implementation of DCD for imminent or cardiac death in hospitals across the USA. We conducted a nonstructured review of selected publications and websites for data extraction and synthesis. The recommended 5 min of circulatory arrest does not universally fulfill the dead donor rule when applied to otherwise neurologically intact donors. Scientific evidence from extracorporeal perfusion in circulatory arrest suggests that the procurement process itself can be the event causing irreversibility in DCD. Legislative abandonment of the dead donor rule to permit the recovery of transplantable organs is necessary in the absence of an adequate scientific foundation for DCD practice. The designation of organ procurement organizations or affiliates to obtain organ donation consent introduces self-serving bias and conflicts of interest that interfere with true informed consent. It is important that donors and their families are not denied a 'good death', and the impact of DCD on quality of end-of-life care has not been satisfactorily addressed to achieve this.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number166
JournalCritical Care
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 29 2006

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Tissue and Organ Procurement
Conflict of Interest
Brain Death
Terminal Care
Informed Consent
Nervous System
Publications
Perfusion
Quality of Life
Organizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Organ donation after circulatory death : The forgotten donor? / Rady, Mohamed Y.; Verheijde, Joseph L.; McGregor, Joan.

In: Critical Care, Vol. 10, No. 5, 166, 29.09.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rady, Mohamed Y. ; Verheijde, Joseph L. ; McGregor, Joan. / Organ donation after circulatory death : The forgotten donor?. In: Critical Care. 2006 ; Vol. 10, No. 5.
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